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Office of Student Conduct

Anonymous Ask

These questions have been asked anonymously by submitting a question through this form. Questions are answered by staff members in the Office of Student Conduct.

Q: Hey so I am in a lab class, and I know how much plagiarism and cheating is an issue in this class. I was confused on the instructions on how to draw a graph. I was confused and I asked someone who had taken the lab to explain what the graph was supposed to be like. Once I understood it, I was able to draw the graph and continue the post-lab. I did not ask this person to draw the graph for me or see her old labs. Is that a problem?
 
A: This will depend on what the guidelines of the assignment were. These can often be found in the assignment itself or in the syllabus. If it does not specify the perimeters of the assignment, you should ask your professor. If you think you may have violated the Code of Academic Integrity, you can complete a self-referral. 
 
If a student decides to do a self- referral they must report themselves in writing to the Office of Student Conduct. There is an online electronic referral form on the Office of Student Conduct website, found here: http://www.osc.umd.edu/OSC/ReferACase.aspx, that we encourage and prefer students to use. After the referral has been received the case will be investigated. If there was no previous suspicion of the act of academic dishonesty by anyone else, then the student will not be charged or left with a disciplinary record. The teacher will be notified of the self-referral and they will be consulted to help determine an appropriate sanction. A student cannot get a sanction of an "XF" if their self-referral is accepted. They will generally have to complete an academic integrity seminar and may face a letter grade reduction, a grade of “F”, or a zero on the academic exercise in question.
 
However, if it is determined that there was already suspicion of academic dishonesty at the time the student admitted to the act the self-referral will not be accepted and the issue will be handled as defined in the Code. In these cases the student’s admission could be considered a mitigating circumstance when it comes down to determining a proper sanction.
It is important to note that a student can only use the self –referral option once during their enrollment at the University of Maryland.

Q: I overheard students sharing information about what diagrams and questions will be on an Anatomy practical during lecture. Should I report them?
 
A: Per Part 11 of the Code of Academic Integrity, "Any member of the University community who has witnessed an apparent act of academic dishonesty... has the responsibility to inform the Office of Student Conduct promptly." The referral form can be found here: http://osc.umd.edu/OSC/ReferACase.aspx. You can also speak with your professor and alert them to the incident. It is important that cases are referred to our office to maintain the integrity of the assignment, ensure fairness in the course, and to be able to assess students' knowledge of the material.

Q: If I am on campus when am I required to produce my ID?  Who has a legal right request to see my ID and for what reasons?  Under what circumstances can I refuse to show my ID without reprisal? thank you
 
A: The police and any University official may ask you to produce your ID at any time when you are on campus. If you refuse to reproduce your ID, you may be referred to OSC for violating Part 10(p) of the Code of Student Conduct, which is defined as "Failure to comply with the directions of University officials, including campus police officers, acting in performance of their duties." It is also important to note that your University issued ID states "surrender upon demand" which indicates that you should produce it for a University official acting in an official capacity. This is done so we can verify the identity and purpose of those on campus.

Q: I submitted a petition to void form recently. When can I expect a reply back regarding the status of my petition? And who exactly decides whether or not the petition is granted? Thanks

A: Answer: As stated in the instructions, petitions to void a disciplinary file are typically reviewed within two to three weeks of receipt. A professional staff member in the Office of Student Conduct reviews the petition.

Q: Last semester I failed a class and I am retaking it again. I have my old exams with the key that the teacher had given us. Is it against the Code of Academic Integrity to share these past exams with fellow students? She does post old exams on Canvas as well. And I have also seen old exams online that other professors that teach the same course have uploaded for anyone to see. Is it case by case depending on the teacher? I just want to know if it against the code to share old exams. Thank you.

A: Repeating a course can be tricky, especially when the work is the same. You are absolutely correct that it is case by case and you should ask your professor before disseminating any materials they have distributed in any section of the course. It would also be a good idea to inform your professor that you have access to the previous work, as the professor may not be aware of this. Doing so will work to increase the respect your professor has for you. 
It is a good rule of thumb that anything your professor does not provide to the entire class is considered an "unauthorized aid" and would thus be considered cheating to use, and facilitation to distribute. Additionally, it is important to keep in mind that you should never assume that you can turn in the same work that you submitted in the previous semester, as this may be considered self-plagiarism. Thank you for asking us beforehand, and you should definitely ask your professor about her guidelines.

Q: I want to report someone for cheating, but I am concerned that if I do they will counter accuse me of cheating even though I have not cheated. Has this happened in the past, where the accused responds by accusing the accuser to get revenge? What procedures are in place to protect the accuser?

A: You can anonymously report that a student may have committed academic dishonesty. However, the burden of proof rests on the complaining party. If you do not want to be the complaining party, you can report the behavior to your professor or teaching assistant, who may then refer the case to the Office of Student Conduct. We do encourage all students to report incidents of violations of the Code of Academic Dishonesty to help maintain the integrity of the degrees conferred upon University of Maryland students.
Each referral is reviewed by a student conduct professional. After reviewing the referral information and meeting with the students for their preliminary interviews the staff members make determinations as to whether or not there is reasonable cause for an allegation and determine if disciplinary action should be taken against the student. If a student submitted a referral against you in a purely retaliatory manner and if there is no evidence to support the accusation, the referral would be dismissed.

Q: For the 'petition to void file' process, who exactly decides whether a file is voided? What are the chances of a file being voided a year after the incident occurred? This is causing me a great deal of stress, and I would really appreciate an answer. Thanks. Are some cases (academic dishonesty vs underage drinking, for example) more likely to pass a petition to be voided than others?
 
A: The Office of Student Conduct has a  "Petition to Void” process which is a series of reflections done by the student and reviewed by the Office of Student Conduct staff. Under Part 52 of the Code of Student Conduct, factors to be considered in review of petitions shall include the present demeanor of the respondent, the conduct of the respondent subsequent to the violations, and the nature of the violation and the severity of any damage, injury, or harm resulting from it. The petitions are reviewed for the level of reflection and growth of the student. Because the petitions are reviewed along these criteria, there is no way to give an estimate of the likelihood that a petition would be granted. Petitions that answer all questions thoroughly, thoughtfully, and completely that show reflection are most likely to be granted. Both academic and non-academic cases are eligible for petitions to void, and one is not more likely than the other to be voided.

Q:Today during final exam, I saw two students in the back of the classroom sharing one another papers and the professor not noticing. We were behind computers and I could see it in the reflection. I assume this is breaking academic integrity. What do I do?

A: Thank you, this could definitely be a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity. We recommend that you notify your professor as soon as possible about what you witnessed so they can submit a referral to our office. If you don't know the students' name please be as specific as you can in your description of the students, where they were sitting, and when you noticed the incident. The more detail you can provide the better. Your participation in this can be kept anonymous but you would likely be asked to submit a written statement detailing what you witnessed. 

Q: What are the possible consequences for forging a doctor's note in order to take a test I missed? This is my first offense and I am a good student.
 
A: That would be a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity. Specifically, Part 1 (a) "fraud, deceit, or dishonesty in any academic course or exercise in an attempt to gain an unfair advantage and/or intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic course or exercise." The normal sanction outlined in the Code for undergraduate students is an "XF" in the course. Repeated violations or violations requiring premeditation can be considered aggravating, which could increase the severity of the sanction. You should follow the instructions outlined in any correspondence you receive from the Office of Student Conduct or any other University office.You should follow the instructions outlined in any correspondence you receive from the Office of Student Conduct or any other University office. We would also encourage you to explore the option of a self-referral. 
 
If a student decides to do a self- referral they must report themselves in writing to the Office of Student Conduct. There is an online electronic referral form on the Office of Student Conduct website, found here: http://www.osc.umd.edu/OSC/ReferACase.aspx, that we encourage and prefer students to use. After the referral has been received the case will be investigated. If there was no previous suspicion of the act of academic dishonesty by anyone else, then the student will not be charged or left with a disciplinary record. The teacher will be notified of the self-referral and they will be consulted to help determine an appropriate sanction. A student cannot get a sanction of an "XF" if their self-referral is accepted. They will generally have to complete an academic integrity seminar and may face a letter grade reduction, a grade of “F”, or a zero on the academic exercise in question.

However, if it is determined that there was already suspicion of academic dishonesty at the time the student admitted to the act the self-referral will not be accepted and the issue will be handled as defined in the Code. In these cases the student’s admission could be considered a mitigating circumstance when it comes down to determining a proper sanction.
It is important to note that a student can only use the self –referral option once during their enrollment at the University of Maryland.

Q: My roommate and I want to streak across campus. What will happen if we do this?
A: We would advise that you do not do this, as this is a serious violation. If you do, you may be found to be in violation of the University of Maryland Sexual Misconduct Policy. This would also be a violation of the Code of Student Conduct Part 10 (o), defined as "engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct which interferes with the activities of others, including studying, teaching, research, and University administration." If you are found to be in violation of either the Code or the Sexual Misconduct Policy you would face disciplinary action. You might also want to reflect on why you and your roommate want to streak across campus. If you are looking for additional activities check out some programs in the Stamp or on the Campus Calendar, found here: http://calendar.umd.edu/cal/main/showEventList.rdo;jsessionid=0A78ACCAACF409082BD2C02EFBF0CB55.

Q: Because of all the white nationalism (chants, vandalism, violence) being advocated under the Trump banner, and which Trump has never dissavowed, is it fair to consider Trump campaign material as hate speech?
A: There is no definition for hate speech in our Code of Student Conduct. At the University the Office of Civil Rights and Sexual Misconduct is receiving reports of incidents of harassment and discrimination. To report or discuss concerns, you can contact their office at 301-405-1142 or email at TitleIXCoordinator@umd.edu or CivilRights@umd.edu. Please be aware that there are additional offices on campus to serve and support students experiencing discrimination, including the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Office of Multicultural Involvement and Community Advocacy, the LGBT Equity Center, and the Nyumburu Cultural Center.

Q: If I catch a squirrel in our campus and try to make it a pet, will I be penalized? They are soooo cute! I am addicted with them and I take pictures of squirrels everyday.
A: Squirrels are cute, but they are wild animals and should not be kept as pets, as they can be dangerous. If you live in the Residence Halls, the Residence Hall Rules prohibit "bringing or housing an animal inside a residence hall." If you do not live on campus, it may also be illegal where you live, so you should check with your landlord and local laws. 
Depending on how you were to catch and keep the squirrel, it is possible that you would be in violation of the Code of Student Conduct Part 10 (o): "Engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct which interferes with the activities of others, including studying, teaching, research, and University administration." Please keep in mind that there are many health and safety issues associated with keeping wild animals as pets, both for humans and and for squirrels. 

Q: A student in my class asked me to sell my notes to him. Can I get in trouble if I do?
A: When you take notes in a class, you are adapting the knowledge that the professors have created for their class. The University Commercial Use of Course Materials, which can be found here, explains that professors “do own the copyright in the selection and their expression of those facts and ideas.” While they may be your own notes, they are a reflection of the selection of materials that a professor has deemed important for that class, which may violate the Copyright laws/policies. The Policy further states that while you can use the notes for your own personal use, like studying, “persons who reproduce, distribute, post online or make derivative works based on Course Materials for any purpose other than their own personal use may be found to have infringed the copyrights of faculty in their Course Materials.”
Should you violate copyright law, this would be a violation of Part 10, Section 10 (q) of the Code of Student Conduct, which is “violation of published University regulations or policies, as approved and compiled by the Vice President for Student Affairs. Such regulations or policies may include the residence hall contract, as well as those regulations relating to entry and use of University facilities, sale of alcoholic beverages, use of vehicles and amplifying equipment, campus demonstrations, and misuse of identification cards.” You should always ask your professor if you are going to sell the notes you took from their original materials.
It is also important to note that this could also violate the Code of Academic Integrity by facilitating academic dishonesty, which is defined as “intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of the Code” depending on what type of material is in your notes.

Q: If you're an international graduate student and you get an XF, will you also get a suspension?  Also how long is the suspension and how will it effect their status.
A: There is no one standard approach to sanctioning a graduate student found responsible for violating the Code of Academic Integrity. The two sanctions are separate from each other, one affecting the grade in the course, and the other affecting their student status with the University. In most cases, an"XF" will result if you are found responsible for academic dishonesty. The dismissal sanction will vary based on a number of factors, but including the faculty member's recommendation, the egregiousness of the offense, and the demeanor of the respondent.
Please note that if a graduate student is suspended and not expelled, the ability to return to the program to complete the graduate degree will rest in large part with their supporting academic department. It is therefore imperative that the graduate student understand that being suspended may result in their inability to return to complete the program in question. It is also important that the student discuss this issue with the ISSS. The Office of Student Conduct will pay attention to the needs associated with a students international status, but it will not be a condition on whether the student gets a worse sanction. 
All of these questions will be answered during a preliminary interview, which is the first step in the process. At this meeting you are presented with the referral from the professor and any supporting documents that have been submitted. In the meeting review your options for how the case will proceed and the possible sanctions you may be facing.

Q: Hello. In my class we have an online quiz about the lecture at the end of every class. Usually I get these wrong but today the question was pretty easy. I was about to enter my answer but I overheard two people talking (we are allowed to talk during this quiz) and I realized I made a mistake. I talked to them and asked why they had a different answer. Once I understood why they had a different answer than me, I did my calculations the right way and submitted that answer. Is that not in accordance with academic integrity? Thanks.
A: Thank you for being so conscientious in asking this question. It is also admirable that you took the time to understand the material, and did not simply change your answer.
Cheating is defined in Part 1 section (a) of the Code of Academic Integrity as "fraud, deceit, or dishonesty in any academic course or exercise in an attempt to gain an unfair advantage and/or intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic course or exercise." If you are permitted by your professor to talk and work together during the quiz, doing so would not be considered an unauthorized study aid, and thus would not be cheating.
If this type of behavior is not allowed, you could be in violation of the Code for cheating, and the person helping you could be in violation for facilitation, or "intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of this Code." It is important to be mindful of your professors' instructions and expectations for each assignment or assessment, as these instructions can vary with each professor, class, assignment, or assessment. Your syllabus can provide you with information as to your professor's expectations, but it is important to always ask your professor or TA if you are unsure of the parameters of the assignment or assessment.

Q: My friend and I registered each other's cars under our DOTS account so that I could park in a lot that I wasn't offered. Everything was fine and I was eligible for the lot this semester, so I registered my own car in the lot I wanted. My friend deleted my car from her vehicle list recently and somehow it affected me and deleted my vehicle from my current account and I may receive a citation. Now when I try to add my car to the existing permit I have, it won't let me, stating that the car is already in the system and to contact DOTS. I'm scared if I contact them that they will see that we had registered each other's cars in different lots and will fine us or expel us. What should we do? Will DOTS penalize us for registering each other's cars, even if we say we carpooled? 
A: You should do as the system directed you and contact DOTS to sort out the problem. Because it is a violation of the DOTS Parking Regulations, found here: http://www.transportation.umd.edu/parking/pdf/parking_regulations.pdf, to "share a registration" and "students may not add the same vehicle to multiple parking registrations" (p. 14), it is possible that they may issue a fine for this violation. These cases are rarely referred to the Office of Student Conduct for disciplinary action, and you would not be expelled for this violation. In the future, you should review all relevant regulations when engaging with various departments or organizations so that you are aware of the restrictions and consequences for violating them.

Q: I am an international student. I am from China and my citizenship is Chinese. I am now 18 years old and allowed to drink alcohol, according to the law of China, in China. But I am not allowed to drink alcohol in the U.S. because I am under 21. If i drink alcohol in China during my winter break, will I get in troubles when I return to University of Maryland?
A: Thank you for asking such a thoughtful question! According to the Code of Student Conduct, Part 10 (r), the "use or possession of any alcoholic beverage under the age of 21; knowingly providing alcoholic beverages to a person known to be under the age of 21" is prohibited conduct. The Code also applies off campus, even when students are abroad. This means that drinking under the age of 21 anywhere is a violation of the Code of Student Conduct, however; under Part 9 (c) of the Code, the actions must "affect the safety of the University community or the orderly operation of the University" for a student to face any disciplinary action at the University.

Q: If the UMCP police send you to the hospital because of intoxication, what corrective action can you face?
A: In this instance, a student would be called in for a preliminary interview at with a staff member in the Office of Student Conduct or with a staff member from Resident Life. At that meeting students review the charges. It is very likely that the Responsible Action Policy, found here: http://www.president.umd.edu/administration/policies/section-v-student-affairs/v-100j, will apply, which would require you to complete alcohol and drug education, but students would be left with no disciplinary record. The application of this policy is left to the discretion of the Office of Student Conduct, based on a student's previous disciplinary record and the circumstances surrounding the incident. The safety of our community is paramount and we would never want possible disciplinary action to prohibit students from seeking help.

Q: The second semester of my freshman year on one of my essays I never finished my citation for my opening sentence, so it was tagged for plagiarism. I tried to explain to her it was an honest mistake, but she reported it to the Dean of Student Conduct anyway. So there is a mark on that particular assignment, but I passed the class with a B. Would that affect acceptance into graduate schools?
A: If your professor reports your case to the Office of Student Conduct and you are found responsible for the violation you will have a disciplinary record with the office, regardless of the grade you receive in the course. All records are usually voided after three years; however, you may petition to void your file by completing a form in the office which will void your file before this three year period has ended. Depending on how questions on the application are phrased, you may not need to disclose your disciplinary history. We would strongly encourage you to answer all questions honestly and accurately. If a graduate school you are applying to requests a background check from the University of Maryland and that three year period has not ended, your case of academic misconduct will be noted. We cannot say whether a sanction will prevent you from entering graduate schools, but the information we provide about a violation is limited to the type of violation, the type of sanction, and the status of that case. Don't let a disciplinary history inhibit you from pursuing your academic and/or professional plans, just be sure to acknowledge it should you be asked. Students with a disciplinary history are considered for admission to graduate schools.

Q: I was referred to the OSC for an incident, but it did not go further than that. I had to complete a stimulating activity but no XF was given, as per the teachers recommendation. I am applying to Law School this coming cycle, will this incident be on my transcript? Will schools be able to see / notified that I had been through your office before?
A: If you did not receive an "XF" and were not dismissed from the University, disciplinary action will not be noted on your transcript. You do have a disciplinary file with the University. All records are automatically voided after three years; however, you are able to submit a Petition to Void which will void your file before this three year period has ended. If a law school you are applying to requests a background check from the University of Maryland and that three year period has not ended your case of academic misconduct will be noted. We will only report the misconduct case if the school does a background check and requests the information or if you are requesting we send a letter of your judicial standing to that institution. Faculty members do not have access to our system where disciplinary records are kept so they are not able to go in themselves and find out information about your record with our office.

Q: Hello, I was academically dismissed from UMD in January 2015 due to bad grades from Spring and Fall 2014 semesters. There was a lot of stress that year, like my grandmother's death, mother's declining health, parents heading for divorce after 30 years, and a father who is controlling father who is mentally and verbally abusive towards my mother, along with him being a drug addict and alcoholic. When I first transferred to UMD my GPA was a 3.5 and it drastically dropped to a 1.3 with 54 credits. I was told to request for retroactive withdrawal. Is it still possible to apply for retroactive withdrawal even though it's been a year and a half?
A: It sounds like you've been going through a lot. Your academic advisor should be able to address questions pertaining to your academic performance and record. The Office of the Registrar is the office through which you would apply for retroactive withdrawal. They may be able to answer more specific questions regarding your circumstances. Their contact information can be found at the top of this page: http://www.registrar.umd.edu/.

Q: If a student has graduated and walked across the stage, and an outside party not related to the university or the professor tries to accuse the student of plagiarism, is it still possible for the student to face disciplinary actions in terms of opening up a case about them and having to go to the honor council? The outside party accusing the student is also not in the United States.
A: Anyone may refer a case to our office, and each referral is reviewed by a student conduct professional. After reviewing the referral information and meeting with the students for their preliminary interviews the staff members make determinations as to whether or not there is reasonable cause for an allegation and determine if disciplinary action should be taken against the student. There is no statute of limitations as to when a case can be brought to the Office of Student Conduct, and each incident is investigated. If the student has graduated, but the disciplinary matter occurred prior to graduation, charges could still be brought against the student; however, the timing of when the offense occurred could impact the treatment of the case.

Q: If I get an XF in a pre req course from last semester but am already registered in testudo for the next course this upcoming semester can I still take it or will I have to drop?
A: If you have an "XF" in a prerequisite course then you have not successfully passed the class. You should check with the specific department to find out their policy.

Q: How will an XF affect my participation in a sorority?
A: According to the Code of Academic Integrity, "no student with an “XF” on the student’s transcript shall be permitted to represent the University in any extracurricular activity, or run for or hold office in any student organization which is allowed to use University facilities, or which receives University funds." This means that you may not be able to hold an officer role in your sorority while the "XF" is on your transcript. Specific sororities might have their own policies regarding the "XF" so it is important to be aware of those as well. Additionally, if there is a GPA requirement, the "XF" could impact your participation in that way. Q: Does OSC or Honor Council take into account personal factors when reviewing these cases? For example, say a student would lose his scholarship because of one lapse in judgment, and that scholarship is the reason why he is at the University. And then, this student would have no way of paying tuition? I guess in summary, I’m wondering if OSC/Honors Council people actually have a heart…
A: The Office of Student Conduct and the Honor Council consists of staff and students who are all working towards upholding the integrity of this university. We do not operate with malicious intent and the sanctions are meant to have educational components so that the students can learn from their mistakes. Section 16 of the Code of Academic Integrity states that “the Director of Student Conduct or a designee reserves the right to levy lesser or more severe sanctions depending on factors such as the nature and importance of the academic exercise; the degree of premeditation or planning, the extent of dishonest or malicious intent, and whether the violation is a first-time or repeat offense.”
Mitigating circumstances are taken into account when reviewing cases; however, the definition of mitigating factors, as defined in Section 12 of the Code of Student Conduct are “ the present demeanor and past disciplinary record of the offender, as well as the nature of the offense and the severity of any damage, injury, or harm resulting from it”. The loss of a scholarship would not count as a mitigating factor because it did inform or impact the student’s decision to commit the violation. We recognize that there are a lot of unintended and sometimes extremely unfortunate consequences, of the sanctions that are imposed but we must make sure that the sanction falls in line with what is defined in the Code.

Q: Hello. What exactly goes on in a preliminary review? Will the accusing professor/faculty be in attendance? If not, can one request his/her attendance?
A: During the preliminary interview a member of the Office of Student Conduct will go over the case referral and any additional evidence that was submitted by the complaining party. Additionally, they will ask clarifying questions to get your account of the incident. The purpose of the preliminary interview is not to determine whether or not you are responsible. It serves as an opportunity to educate you about the process that you can expect with our office and the options that you have moving forward. The faculty members or professors are not present at the interview and you cannot request their attendance. If your case moves forward to an Honor Review or a Disciplinary Conference we try to have the complaining party present. However, their attendance is not required.

Q: What is the typical timeline after a student receives a referral? When can he/she expect to get a preliminary hearing, or a review by the council?
A: After our office receives a referral it generally takes up to one week for us to notify the student. Once the student is notified they are asked to call and set up a time to come in and have their preliminary interview with one of our staff members. Preliminary Interviews are scheduled based upon the student and staff member's availability. We aim to notify the student of when their Honor Review will occur within two weeks after we receive their Informal Resolution that indicates that they want to move forward with a hearing. However, an exact timeline as to how soon the Honor Review will occur cannot be given because it depends on the number of pending honor reviews we have in queue at and the availability of those involved with the honor review (complaining party, witnesses, etc.).

Q: Is it possible that a professor suggests no penalty? And maybe perhaps he/she just wanted to "teach the student a lesson"?
A: We do ask professors for a sanction recommendation with their referral and it is possible that they could suggest a sanction that is lesser than what is stated in the Code of Academic Integrity. However, the Office of Student Conduct and/or Student Honor Council are responsible for determining final sanctions for students found responsible for a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity.

Q: Who reviews the evidence to determine whether there is reasonable cause to an allegation? If this is a small subset of students or faculty, wouldn’t this judgment be subject to bias? I’m all for OSC’s missions and plans, but I think it may seem unfair to all the accused...
A: All referrals are reviewed by highly trained and experienced Office of Student Conduct staff. After reviewing the referral information and meeting with the students for their preliminary interviews the staff members make determinations as to whether or not there is reasonable cause for allegation and determine if charges should be brought. Our process aims to always give the student the most amount of due process. Each student is given the opportunity to take their case to an Honor Review where they can present their own information to refute the allegation. The Honor Board consists of students, faculty and staff from all across campus are the finders of fact.

Q: Is there any way I can review statistics or a breakdown of OSC happenings? Of how many cases go to honors council, how many get an "XF", or how many students actually take their case to the honors council?
A: At the end of every academic year the Office of Student Conduct puts together an Annual Report that summarizes the statistics of the office, such as the number of referrals received, the number of Honor Council Hearings, number of “XF” given, etc. While this document is not available on our website, the information may be shared with whoever requests it.

Q: Say that I am receiving an “XF”. Will my parents or other professors or advisers be notified? Who can see this? For example, say I’m in a program at UMD. Would the director/head of the program be able to see this “XF”?
A: The professor that referred your case will be notified of the outcome and the sanction determination. Your parents, other professors, and advisors will not be notified that you have received an “XF”. However, the “XF” will be present on your transcript. If a program director were to see your transcript, the “XF” would be visible. Depending on your sanction the “XF” can be petitioned to be removed and replaced with an F after a specified period of time. In short, the “XF” will be seen by individuals that you have given permission to see your transcript.

Q: Could it be possible that a referral is made to a wrong student?
A: Professors refer students when they have reason to suspect that they have violated some part of the Code. However, mistakes and misunderstandings do happen and students can be referred who have not actually violated the Code. During the preliminary interview the OSC staff member will hear the student’s account of the incident and if there is reason to dismiss the charges the steps will be taken to do so. If the student has to take their case to an Honor Review the burden is on the professor or complaining party to show that the student is responsible based on clear and convincing evidence. A referral to our office does not mean that a student will automatically be found responsible. We work hard to seek out the truth so that every student is treated fairly.

Q: How does one rebuild an academic career after an “XF”? Is it even possible? Is it worth trying?
A: It is possible to rebuild your academic career after an “XF” and it is definitely worth trying to do! Depending on your sanction your “XF” can be petitioned to be replaced with an F after a specified period of time. Students can work hard to retake the class that they failed and to excel in their other classes to help raise their GPA. An “XF” does affect your academic career but it does not cripple it. Many students go on to excel academically and professionally. Our sanctions are meant to have educational and punitive components. Our hope is that you learn from this sanction and continue to excel in other aspects of your academic career. It is important to remember that college success is not just dictated by your GPA.

Q: Could accused students reason with a professor privately on a matter?
A: Some professors may reach out to a student prior to submitting their referral but it is not required. However, some professors may not wish to speak with the student regarding the referral. You may respectfully reach out to your professor if you so choose but once the referral is received by our office the case will be resolved through our office.

Q: If you are referred to the OSC by your professor, do you have the right to view your case and evidence before any preliminary meeting or informal resolution?
A: Yes, students have the right to see their case files after they have been referred to the Office. At the preliminary interviews, students are automatically shown the files pertaining to their case, including the referral and any additional evidence the complaining party has submitted. If a student wants to see their case files before their preliminary interview, or if they want their own copy of the files, they just need to request them. This can be done by either calling the office and having them emailed to you or by coming into the office in person and having a copy printed out for you (be sure to bring your student ID). As a point of clarification, informal resolutions are not a meeting. They are a form that a student must fill out to determine if they want to move forward with an honor review or disciplinary conference (if available), or if they want to accept responsibility and agree to the specified sanction.

Q: I was accused of academic dishonesty because my code was very similar to my friend's. It turns out that he took pictures of my code without me knowing. Since I did not allow him to take pictures of my code, will my case be dropped?
A: This would be a great piece of information to share during your preliminary interview. If your friend did indeed take pictures of your code without your knowledge or permission then the charges against you could possibly be dismissed. However, this is information that would need to be able to be proven or supported by evidence.

Q: Is it a violation of the Code of Student Conduct to create a Google Docs for people in the same class to share notes?
A: While it may not be a violation of the Code of Student Conduct it could potentially be a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity. Each professor has different opinions of what they consider acceptable collaboration for their course. Therefore, it is difficult to directly say whether or not this would be violating the Code of Academic Integrity. There is no language in the Code that speaks directly to the use of Google Docs; however, we have had previous cases with our office that were the result of problems with Google Doc usage in classes. In order to be on the safe side, you should contact the professor or the TA to ask if the use of a Google Doc to share class notes fits within the specified expectations and/ or restrictions of the course.

Q: Is it appropriate for an academic department to hire a "Professor of the Practice" who does not teach, i.e. "profess"?
A: The hiring practices of academic departments do not fall within the jurisdiction of the Office of Student Conduct. However, you are completely within your right as a student to state your concerns about your professors to your academic departments. You can go to the department chair to raise your concern about who is hired to teach. They can always explain their approach as to how they develop the curriculum. Also, the Course Evaluations that happen at the end of every semester is another way to vocalize your concerns. Additionally, you can contact the Ombuds Office. The Ombuds officers have the job of addressing concerns of students and staff. They would be able to provide more information about the hiring practices of the academic apartments. More information about the Ombuds Office can be found here: http://www.umd.edu/ombuds/.

Q: I'm taking a class that primarily teaches us how to use Matlab for various engineering purposes. The weekly homeworks can be very challenging, even though they are often generalized applications of the material we are learning. Because of the nature of coding, an important way of learning is seeing someone else do a problem. I think this is why my TA will often send the solution (or a portion of the solution) in response to emails with questions for guidance. Is it okay to use and share the TA's solution? The TA does not discriminate and the class is probably curved.
A: This would be a great question to ask your TA! While they are sharing this information with you, they might be doing so in a specific context, or just not be comfortable with you sharing your email exchanges with others. Your professor and TA are the only one who can give you permission to disseminate your correspondence to other students. You may also refer other classmates to the TA for further assistance. It's also a good idea to have your professor talk about this issue with the entire class.

Q: In a previous semester I knew about cheating in an outside-of-class competition. It was a University competition, stemmed from a class-project, but the outcome did not impact students' grades and the students only got a title at the end of the day. Are there any potential ramifications for this type of cheating?
A: What a great question. There are many competitions held on campus for students to participate in that encourages innovative thinking with the spirit of competition. While all cases that are processed through the Office of Student Conduct pertain to assignments that were submitted for a grade, this would be something you could bring up to the people or the department running the competition. Similarly to academic integrity in the classroom, if a competition is tainted with cheating it lowers the integrity of the entire outcome, and it would be helpful to those in charge to know and be able to respond appropriately to the situation.

Q: What if there is no actual evidence? It is just he said/she said or my word against hers?
A: When a case comes into the Office of Student Conduct we first review the evidence and the referral for every student to determine if there is enough cause to move forward with investigating the case. If there truly is not evidence then the case would most likely be dismissed at this point. If the case is not dismissed, every student has the right to take their case to an Honor Review where they can present their side of the case and contest the evidence, or lack thereof. Each side has the opportunity to present their case to the board. We use a clear and convincing standard of evidence in the honor review process. In Section 30 of the Code of Student Conduct it states that “clear and convincing means “evidence should be ‘clear’ in the sense that it is certain, plain to understand and unambiguous, and ‘convincing’ in the sense that it is so reasonable and persuasive as to cause [one] to believe it”. It is evidences that is more highly probable to be true than not and the hearing panel or OSC administrator has a firm belief of conviction in it.

Q: Students (maybe) have the right of free speech when it comes to chalking messages on school sidewalks. But does the constitutional right to free speech protect them from individuals unaffiliated with any organization erasing the chalk?
A: There are no University policies that speak to a student’s right to erase another organizations chalking. Chalking is by definition temporary and the University has no way to regulate who erases the chalk. There are rules as to where students can chalk and that information can be found here: http://thestamp.umd.edu/event_guest_services/policies#advertl.

Q: Is it a violation of the Code of Student Conduct for a 21-year-old student who lives in Washington, D.C., where recreational marijuana is legal, to use marijuana in their home as permitted by the law?
A: This would not be a violation of the Code of Student Conduct because you are permitted by law to participate in recreational marijuana use in your home that is in Washington, D.C. However, if you were to bring the marijuana on campus that would be a violation of the Code.

Q: Is it against Residence Hall Rules or the Code of Student Conduct to display/have empty glass alcohol bottles while under 21? If it matters, the bottles are empty and are used solely for decorative purposes.
A: It is not a violation of policy to have empty alcohol bottles displayed in your room if you are under 21. However, if the bottles are empty because they have been drunk by a party of underage students, the numerous empty bottles might be considered as evidence that the students were drinking underage.

Q: Right now, I am taking a course that is extremely similar to a course that I took last semester. The subject, several of the books, my TA, and even my professor are the same. One class is required for my major and the other is required for a living and learning program.
My professor assigned a paper topic that is extremely similar to the one they assigned last semester. Would it count as plagiarism if I "recycle" some ideas from the paper I submitted last semester? I won't copy and past paragraphs worth of information from my last paper, but I wanted to reuse certain quotes that I cited from the books. I'd rather be safe than sorry, though.
A: As long as you properly cite the quotes that you plan to use again it should be acceptable to reuse some of the same sources. If you plan on reusing some of the same major points that you made in your previous paper there are specified ways to cite yourself, depending on the citation style used. To be safe you should ask your professor for permission to recycle some ideas from your previous paper.

Q: If my professor is accusing me of fabricating data on a lab report, and he says that he can give me a zero and report it to the OSC, will there be a record of this in the system for medical schools to see. I am applying for medical school, will my advisors have access to this or will I have to give them access. I understand I am not receiving an XF but only a zero on the assignment, so would it even be recorded in the OSC for future reference. Is there anyway to have the record removed? Can any faculty member at UMD access this? My advisor is forwarding my application for a program and this will come to their attention if I don't notify them or will they be automatically notified? Can they go in themselves and find out about my record in the OSC?
A: If your professor reports your case to our office and you are found responsible for the violation you will have a disciplinary record with our office. All records are automatically voided after three years; however, you are able to submit a Petition to Void which will void your file before this three year period has ended. If a medical or graduate school you are applying to requests a background check from the University of Maryland and that three year period has not ended your case of academic misconduct will be noted. We will only report the misconduct case if the school does a background check and requests the information or if you are requesting we send a letter of your judicial standing to that institution. Faculty members do not have access to our system where disciplinary records are kept so they are not able to go in themselves and find out information about your record with our office.
Q: Do teachers have a certain window of opportunity to file a case against you? Like if you "cheated" fall semester, can the teacher open a case in the spring semester after the class closes?
A: There is no specified window of opportunity for a professor to file a case against a student. A professor can submit a referral after the class has already ended.

Q: Can you plagiarize yourself? For example, if you do an assignment for one class and it happens to overlap with an assignment from another class can you submit the same thing? Or maybe you did an assignment in high school that can be used for a class here, is it considered academic dishonesty to use that assignment again? If yes, what if you edit and revise it?
A: When you plagiarize yourself it is called self-plagiarism. Remember that you are at the University to learn, not just earn good grades. If you want to use materials previously submitted for another class you must ask permission to do so from the previous and current professor. There are also specified ways to cite yourself, depending on the citation style used.

Q: If I get a XF in my prerequisite class of the previous semester during my current semester would I have to drop the current class?
Also, Isn't it too late for the University to give a XF, after the drop/add period has ended, what will happen to the money I paid for the class?
A: If a student is found responsible for a Code of Academic Integrity violation and the sanction given is a “XF” the Office of Student Conduct can apply that XF to a class even if the drop/add period has ended . It is not our intention to impose any financial burden on students but the sanction still stands. You should speak with your academic advisor about this matter. This answer may vary based on the academic department.

Q: I had an "XF" removed and changed to an "F" more than 7 years ago. Does, as an example, the MD bar committee, or US Government, have the right to request my disciplinary record from UMD? Will UMD provide them with this information? Once my disciplinary records are voided in your system, (which, I understand, takes three years) are they erased forever, allowing me to legally never have to bring them up again to anyone again?
A: You are correct that after three years disciplinary records are voided in our system. After that three year period is up we are no longer able to give copies of your disciplinary records to any agency conducting background checks. Depending on how the question is phrased, you may not need to disclose your disciplinary history. We would strongly encourage you to answer all questions honestly and accurately.

Q: If I am missing an exam due to a vacation that was scheduled prior to knowledge of the exam and I will not be here to take it on time, am I allowed to take it a day late?
A: You need to ask your professor if they will allow you to reschedule your exam. It is best that you ask them as soon as possible so that they have plenty of time to make their decision. The professor is not obligated to let you retake an exam because a vacation is not an excused absence; however, professors can be very understanding and sensitive to the circumstances of students.

Q: If I lost a very valuable (in monetary terms and sentimentality) item and a student spent two days convincing me his friend had the item but refused to meet with me, can I turn him in to the Student Conduct Board? All interactions occurred online and although he's deleted his responses I have screenshots of everything.
A: If you believe an item was stolen from you, it is recommended that you report that to the police. This way they can assist with an investigation or potential location of the item. The University of Maryland Police will normally refer such cases to our office. However, if you wish to refer a student to our office for theft without reporting it to the police, you may do so using our online form.

Q: Is it a typical sanction for a student to receive an "XF" if they were caught cheating/facilitating on a homework assignment? Or are they more often given a lesser sanction such as "0" on the assignment? Note: Student is a first-time offender, takes full responsibility, and have admitted his/her actions during the preliminary interview.
A: The normal sanction for any violation of the Code of Academic Integrity is a 12-month “XF”. Mitigating or aggravating circumstances can result in deviations from the normal sanction. A student’s admission of responsibility may result in a different sanction but that is not at all guaranteed. When determining an appropriate sanction the totality of the circumstances will be evaluated.

Q: When is the deadline for a self-referral?
A: There is no deadline for a self- referral. However, it is required that there was no previous suspicion of the academic dishonesty by anyone else. If it is determined that there was already suspicion of academic dishonesty at the time the student admitted to the act the self-referral won’t be accepted. It is important to note that a student can only use the self-referral option once during their enrollment at the University of Maryland.

Q: If you have disciplinary sanctions, what are your chances of getting your records voided? I know factors considered are: conduct subsequent to the violation and the nature of the violation. Is there a certain timeframe in which you should wait to petition voiding the records. I am concerned about the points against me for housing next year.
A: Every student has the right to petition to void their file. You are able to submit a petition to void 90 days after the completion of your case but all of your sanctions must be complete at the time of the petition. The quality of your petition responses contribute to whether or not it will be approved. Questions about how housing points/ status might be affected by a disciplinary sanction should be referred to the Department of Resident Life. They can be contacted at (301) 314-2100.

Q: I did a research paper with proper citation (thats what I think on my part). The instructor has turned it over for plagiarism. What is the course of action as I haven’t received my grade back yet or any correspondence from the office of student conduct and do we get to know where we went wrong as I did all the proper citations.
A: Once your professor has submitted the referral and supplemental documents to our office your case will be reviewed and your will receive correspondence from the Office of Student Conduct to schedule a Preliminary Interview. If a significant amount of time has passed and you still have not heard anything from our office or the professor I would recommend following up with the professor to see if they have submitted a referral, if you feel comfortable doing so. You will be provided with information about resources on campus that can help your go over and improve your understanding of how to properly cite sources once you have your Preliminary Interview. You are more than welcome to contact the Office of Student Conduct at 301-314-8204 if you would like a more immediate response about the status of your case.

Q: What is considered clear and convincing evidence when in the honor review process?
A: In Section 30 of the Code of Student Conduct it states that “’clear and convincing’ means “evidence should be ‘clear’ in the sense that it is certain, plain to the understand and unambiguous, and ‘convincing’ in the sense that it is so reasonable and persuasive as to cause [one] to believe it”. Per the University Student Judiciary Training Manual, clear and convincing evidence is evidence presented during the hearing that is more highly probable to be true than not and the hearing panel or OSC administrator has a firm belief of conviction in it.

Q: When we violate a behavioral student conduct rule, is that violation recorded on our transcript that graduate schools or future employers would see, or is that information not included on transcripts that we ask to be sent out?
A: If you are found responsible for violating the Code of Student Conduct then you will have a disciplinary record with our office. If the conduct violation results in a suspension or expulsion from the University it will be permanently noted on your academic transcript and we will keep a permanent record of it in the office. The Office of Student Conduct voids all other cases after 3 years have passed since the initial decision notice was given. Up until those three years have passed, if a school or place of employment were to conduct a background check and come to our office asking if you had any disciplinary history, we would tell them that there is a disciplinary record. Please be advised that if your case is pending or you have any pending/outstanding sanctions, you will not be able to obtain your academic transcript without contacting our office.

Q: How will I be notified of my referral to the Office of Student Conduct and how soon after my professor submits the case will I be notified? Will it be before the new semester begins if I am being accused for last semester?
A: In order to process a case our office needs the case referral from the professor/ complainant as well as any necessary supplemental materials. Once we receive all of those documents it is approximately a week before the case is processed and the student is notified via their campus email address. Since the student’s notification depends on when the complainant submits all of the materials there is no guarantee that you will know before the new semester begins if you have been referred for an academic integrity violation. It is important to make sure you are checking the email address you have on file with the University because that is how we connect with you.

Q: How can I check the status of a case or if a case was filed on my record?
A: If you have a case with our office you will have received email correspondence from our office telling you so. If you have not received and email correspondence but suspect that you may have a case it is possible that we have not finished processing it yet. You can always contact the Office of Student Conduct directly at 301-314- 8204 to ask about the status of your case.

Q: I was caught twice with marijuana on campus this Fall 2015 semester. I have not even met my preliminary interviewer for the first case. I am assuming I will most likely be kicked out of on campus housing. How can I find housing now and change my agreement so that I don't have to wait for the decision and find housing in a rush. Also if my trial was early in the spring semester, when would I expect to have to move out of housing? Is it possible I would be let off until the end of spring semester?
A: The first thing that you need to do is contact the Department of Resident Life or the Rights and Responsibilities Office to discuss the potential impact on your campus housing. During your preliminary interview, be sure to ask these questions to the staff member you are meeting with. I would not recommend making any major decisions regarding your housing prior to that preliminary interview. The fact that there were two marijuana instances does make your case more complicated. Students may not be terminated from housing until after the conduct process is complete, including any appeals process. However, given that you have two violations it is likely that your housing could be terminated. For future reference, if you are interested in finding off-campus housing options for next year, you may contact Off-Campus Housing Services by visiting their website at http://www.och.umd.edu/OCH/Default.aspx.

Q: About 5 years ago I petitioned to have a grade of an "XF" removed and was granted it. My UMD transcript now says "F" instead. Do other schools/places of employment have access/can gain access to the fact that I, at one point, had an "XF" and was subject to disciplinary action? Do you keep that information or was it, upon my petition being granted, removed from the record permanently? I really do not want to put focus on a part of my transcript that I absolutely don't have to. Thanks.
A: When you submitted your petition the X was removed from your transcript but we still kept the record of the disciplinary action because the void period had not ended. The Office of Student Conduct voids cases after 3 years have passed since the initial sanction was given. Since these three years have passed, if a school or place of employment were to conduct a background check and come to our office asking if you had any disciplinary history, we would report that there is “no disciplinary record”.

Q: If a university faculty member is cognizant of hazing that occurs within a student organization are they legally obligated to take action (intervene to stop the activities and/or report the organization to the officials like the OFC or police)?
A: All members of the University community have the responsibility to report acts of hazing. While faculty members have no legal obligation to report the activities they have an ethical obligation to do so. Our main concern is to stop and prevent further harm to the students. You can reach out to the Office of Student Conduct or the University Police to report any suspicions of hazing. The Counseling Center and the Health Center offer anonymous resources as well. Information about the University’s policies on hazing and resources about hazing can be found at http://www.hazingprevention.umd.edu/.

Q: If I was found “not responsible” on a case, is it still on my academic record or student record? If so, does it go away after I graduate?
A: No, the case is rendered void if you are found not responsible for violations under the Code.

Q: Is there a specific Student Code of Conduct for online students?
A: All University of Maryland students, regardless of if they classes online or in person, are expected to follow the University’s Code of Student Conduct. The Code can be found here: http://www.president.umd.edu/policies/docs/V-100B.pdf.

Q: Hi, I am recently applying for graduate schools. I got a XF for my academic misconduct. Since I turned myself in, my professor gave a sanction that I could remove 'X' after 3 months, so right now I only have "F" on the transcript. I am wondering will my case of academic misconduct influence my application? Will you report the misconduct case?
A: It is important to note that the ‘X’ will only be removed if you have petitioned to have it removed. It does not come off automatically once the three months have ended. The Office of Student Conduct keeps all disciplinary records for three years, after which they will be voided. In cases where a student is suspended or expelled, the record is maintained permanently. If the graduate school you are applying to requests a background check from the University of Maryland and that three year period has not ended your case of academic misconduct will be noted. We will only report the misconduct case if the school does a background check and requests the information or if you are requesting we send a letter of your judicial standing to that institution.

Q: If I have an issue with the way a lab is being run and I feel like the students are helpless in defending themselves from poor grades because of the policies in the class how can I bring that to the attention of the University. I'm sorry this has nothing to do with academic integrity but it does have ethical issues.
A: In situations like this it is best for you to contact the chair of your department with your concerns, especially if your feel like you are being unfairly treated. The University has an Undergraduate Student Grievance Procedure that details how students can go about expressing their concerns with a professor or faculty member. Additionally, you may wish to contact the Ombuds Office for information regarding a concern of this nature.

Q: If plagiarism occurred in a homework that was minimal to the overall grade (i.e. 5% or less) and the teacher has flagged it, is there anything the student can do to avoid getting an XF in the class? Obviously, plagiarism is a very serious offense regardless of the context but one stupid mistake shouldn't predispose a student to a permanent mark so offensive that graduate school, medical school or potential employers would refuse to consider the student in question.
A: You’re right that all violations of the Code of Academic Integrity are serious; however, the weight of the assignment does not influence how the violation is viewed. It doesn’t matter what the assignment was, it matters that the behavior occurred in an academic setting.
The normal sanction for violating the Code at the undergraduate level is a 12-month XF in the course, after 12 months the student can petition to remove the X. The normal sanction for graduate students who engage in academic dishonesty is suspension from the University. Even though these are the normal sanctions they are not the only sanction that may be applied in matters of academic dishonesty. We look at each case separately and consider all circumstances before determining what the sanction should be. It is also not the case that students with an XF on their transcript will never be considered for a position or admission to a school.

Q: I'm curious about the Code of Academic Integrity's use of the phrase "intentional or knowingly." A student may not understand what plagiarism is, due to a language or cultural barrier. Even though the concept may have been explained in class and outlined in the syllabus, to what extent is such a student guilty of plagiarism? Should a plagiarism incident due to a misunderstanding, rather than an "intentional or knowing" copying, still be reported to the Office of Student Conduct?
A: If the student knowingly or intentionally used information from another source and used it in their assignment without citing the original source then this would constitute plagiarism, even if the student would not label it as such. While we are aware that cultural and language barriers influences how students understand and interpret our academic integrity policies, ignorance of the Code is not a defense for violating it. All students at the University are expected to uphold and conduct themselves in accordance with the Code. However, we do take into account a student’s understanding of these concepts when discussing how to address these matters.
The Office of Student Conduct conducts programs designed to educate the student body about the Code. There are numerous resources on campus, such as the Writing Center and librarians, available to students for additional assistance. All suspected violations of the Code of Academic Integrity should be reported to the Office of Student Conduct for further investigation.

Q: If I wanted to have a non-violent protest on campus, how could I do that without getting in trouble? Are there certain places I can't go or someone I need to get approval from?
A: The University Guidelines for Demonstrations and Leafletting details the University’s stance on demonstrations on campus. Students are permitted to hold demonstrations or hand out materials, so long as they do not interfere with others’ rights or the operations of the University. There are certain guidelines that must be followed, such as not blocking traffic or disrupting classes. Demonstrations can be held, scheduled or unscheduled, at McKeldin Mall, Engineering Field, South Chapel Field, Hornbake Plaza, Stamp Student Union, or the Nyumburu Amphitheater. Demonstrations can also be held at other places on campus but they must be approved by the Vice President for Student Affairs. The University respects student’s First Amendment rights to demonstrate and protest as long as it follows the guidelines of the school. If planning to hold a demonstration you should first read over the University guidelines for demonstrations and The University of Maryland’s Freedom of Expression Policy and the Law, which explains how the First Amendment applies to state universities.

Q: If a student is caught with any amount of marijuana on campus, what are their charges, fines, etc.?
A: If you are caught with any amount of marijuana on (or off) campus you may be referred to the Office of Student Conduct and can be charged with violating the Code of Student Conduct. Additionally, you may be charged civilly or criminally by the police. Individuals found possessing less than 10 grams may receive a civil citation while anyone possessing more than 10 grams face criminal charges and possible arrest. Additionally, students found responsible for violating the University’s Drug Policy could face sanctions ranging from Disciplinary Probation through Expulsion depending upon the circumstances.

Q: Does a case about a parking ticket get placed on anything official in regards to my time here as a student?
A: Parking tickets and citations do not go on your student conduct history or records. It will, however, show up on your DOTS account as a charge that you will need to pay. Some violations of parking may be sent to the Office of Student Conduct to investigate if they are repeated, egregious, or involve some form of dishonesty. It is to the discretion of the DOTS staff on whether a matter is referred, but we are in frequent communication with the Department of Transportation Services.

Q: How do you guys approach parking tickets? Like do you consider them very serious if they're the standard citations unknowing students get every once and a while or do you guys take them very seriously?
A: The Office of Student Conduct handles the secondary appeal process for parking tickets. Students can appeal to the Office of Student Conduct only after they have appealed directly to the DOTS Citation Review Unit. The appeal is to be used if there is new information about why the ticket or citation was unjust, not just because the student doesn’t want the ticket. We adhere to the Rules and Regulations that DOTS has in regards to parking citations. That being said, in the appeal process we do take note of mitigating factors like whether or not this is a student’s first ticket or what their class status is. These may, more often than not, result in a reduction of the fine and not a dismissal of the ticket.

Q: I just got referred to the Office of Student Conduct for academic dishonesty. Will dropping the course help me not get in trouble?
A: Dropping the course will not prevent you from having your referral investigated. You do not have to be currently enrolled in the course to be charged with an academic integrity violation in the course. By dropping the class you actually limit the options you have available if you were to be found responsible for the action. The only two available sanctions would then be an F or an XF in the course. However, if you do not drop the class there are more alternative sanctions available, such as a zero on the assignment or a letter grade reduction in the course. We really do not recommend that you drop the course when you get referred for academic dishonesty.

Q: How does the self-referral process work exactly? What are its benefits? Will the teacher that gives the XF ever be notified during the self-referral process?
A: If a student decides to do a self- referral they must report themselves in writing to the Office of Student Conduct. There is an online electronic referral form on the Office of Student Conduct website that we encourage and prefer students to use. However, we will accept referrals via email as well. The important thing is that you bring it to our attention. After the referral has been received the case will be investigated. If there was no previous suspicion of the act of academic dishonesty by anyone else, then the student will not be charged or left with a disciplinary record. The teacher will be notified of the self-referral and they will be consulted to help determine an appropriate sanction. A student cannot get a sanction of a XF if their self-referral is accepted. They will generally have to complete an academic integrity seminar and may face a letter grade reduction, an grade of “F”, or a zero on the academic exercise in question.
However, if it is determined that there was already suspicion of academic dishonesty at the time the student admitted to the act the self-referral will not be accepted and the issue will be handled as defined in the Code. In these cases the student’s admission could be considered a mitigating circumstance when it comes down to determining a proper sanction.
It is important to note that a student can only use the self –referral option once during their enrollment at the University of Maryland.

Q: I was searching for pens in my backpack during an exam and unintentionally saw some notes from the class while I was looking for them. Is this considered academic dishonesty?
A: It is difficult to determine if academic dishonesty occurred given this scenario, as there are many potential variables. If you saw notes that would give you information that would help you on the exam, then it would be considered academic dishonesty. Cheating is defined as “fraud, deceit, or dishonesty in any academic course or exercise in an attempt to gain an unfair advantage and/or intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic course or exercise.” Because those notes were likely considered an unauthorized material, it may meet the definition of cheating. It’s best to sit down to an exam prepared so that you do not need to go into your bag for materials. For example, take out 2-3 writing utensils, and any other materials you may need prior to the exam. If you have notes in your bag, make sure they are in a folder or a notebook where you won’t be able to see the materials should you have to get something from your bag.

Q: Can a sexual partner withdraw consent retroactively?
A: No, a sexual partner cannot withdraw consent retroactively if they were able to give it and did so at the time of the encounter. It is important to remember that consent is an ongoing process. A sexual partner who may have initially agreed to engage in an activity may decide they no longer consent. At this point it is important to stop the activity.
However, there is a difference between withdrawing consent retroactively and never giving clear consent in the first place. It is always important to ensure that all parties are both able to give consent and giving it freely. In many situations involving sexual misconduct a person experiencing an assault or other unwanted behavior may not say “no” and may freeze. This does not constitute consent. It is important to ensure that consent is obtained prior to any activity and throughout the course of the activity. There are a few additional resources you may want to check out if you are unsure: C.A.R.E to Stop Violence in the University Health Center and the Office of Civil Rights and Sexual Misconduct. Both campus resources provide information regarding sexual misconduct, consent, and sexual health/wellness.

Q: Is it legal to go on the roofs of buildings? I find them to be very relaxing places to study, because not everyone knows the windows to get out of.
A: Going on the roofs of buildings is a violation of the Code of Student Conduct. While the roof may be a relaxing place for you it is unauthorized use of a campus building. Climbing out of windows to get on the roof can be dangerous for you and it can be alarming to any passersby who may see you. There are a lot of cool, relaxing places on campus that can serve as an alternative relaxation spot. Some of them are highlighted in this article!

Q: If I have an unexcused absence and consequently miss notes from a class, is it dishonest to ask a classmate for the notes? The teacher for this class does not take attendance, but I still missed class for reasons that other classes typically deem inexcusable.
A: Each professor may have their own policy, however typically you may get notes from another student in the class, as long as they do not facilitate academic dishonesty by giving you access to information you should not have. If you missed an assignment, quiz, exam, etc. and any answers were discussed you should not have access to that information until after you have completed the academic work. But you can always ask your professor to be sure that it is not considered academic dishonesty.

Q: Under what circumstances would parents be contacted in the event of trouble with the police, who referred my name to the OSC?
A: It is generally a good idea for students to talk with their family about any disciplinary issues. It is better that the information comes from you rather than the University or the Police. The Office of Student Conduct may contact your parent/guardian if you are under 18 years old. If a student is over 18, we will communicate directly with the student involved. However, if the student does not respond to emails, a letter may be sent to the permanent mailing address on file. We also request a student notify parents if that student is facing dismissal from the University. It is important to note that the police may contact your parents, and you should contact the department to inquire further about how they make those decisions.

Q: I was caught smoking weed recently, I didn't have anything on me, the police took my name, UID, and birth-date. What can I expect to happen? Does this go on any transcripts or official records? Do they drug test me in the future? Does this affect my academic standing and if it does, how?
A: If your case is referred to the Office of Student Conduct then you can expect that we will contact you to schedule a preliminary interview with a staff member in the office. At this meeting you will be presented with the referral from the police and any supporting documents that have been submitted. In the meeting you will talk about your options for how the case will proceed and the possible sanctions you may be facing, depending upon what parts of the Code of Student Conduct that you are alleged to have violated.
It sounds like you may be alleged to have violated Part 10 (i) of the Code, which is defined as “use or possession of any controlled substance or illegal drug.” Per the Code of Student Conduct, students who are found to have violated Part 10 (i) may be suspended, however per Part 14 of the Code students may be dismissed from the University depending upon any aggravating circumstances, which would impact your academic standing and go on your transcript. However, in cases with significant mitigating factors, students may face Disciplinary Probation with educational sanctions such as Substance Use Intervention Treatment or drug testing.
You may also wish to contact the Student Legal Aid Office, as they can assist you not only with issues at the University, but with criminal issues well.

Q: Is there any way to anonymously report academic dishonesty?
A: Anyone can refer a student for academic dishonesty. While you may also do so anonymously, the burden of proof rests on the complaining party. It may hinder further investigation by the Office of Student Conduct and potentially prohibit the case from moving forward.
If you do not want to be the complaining party, you can report the behavior to your professor or teaching assistant, who may then refer the case to the Office of Student Conduct. We do encourage all students to report incidents of violations of the Code of Academic Dishonesty to help maintain the integrity of the degrees conferred upon University of Maryland students.

Q: Is it considered academic misconduct to ask a friend questions about a project for an engineering design course such as where to purchase parts, what kind of electrical power supply to use, how to manage voltage, or how a certain part works, even if you are not explicitly asking them to perform any specific calculations or draft a design for you? The professor explicitly stated that we ARE allowed to collaborate with other students in our class, but he did not mention whether we could work with students outside the class (in this case, the friend in question does not go to UMD). We are also encouraged to talk to our TFs and to use online resources.
A: This would be a great question for you to ask your professor! Each professor has their own policies and procedures regarding collaboration and what resources students are or are not allowed to use. From your description it sounds like your professor is encouraging the use of additional sources, but as you said, this scenario was not specifically addressed.
Students should always contact their professor when they have a specific question regarding academic honesty in the course. Failure to adhere to their policies could earn you a referral to the Office of Student Conduct for academic dishonesty. The professor may also appreciate your initiative in asking the question, helping you to stand out in the course. No doubt, other students in the course have a similar question, so you are providing a service by stepping up and asking directly. That’s what it means to be a part of an academic community.

Q: I want to take some particular courses that pertain to a hobby of mine, but the courses are only available to students in a certain major, and UMD does not offer a minor. I'm honestly considering just sitting in on the classes and doing the work next semester without enrolling, because I don't want to major in it. Could this get me in any trouble?
A: You should contact your academic advisor and/or the department that is offering the class to determine their policies regarding students who are not enrolled in the course. There is always the option of asking the professor of the course if you can sit in and audit the course due to your interest. The professor often has the discretion as to who takes their course. If their policy states that you are not permitted to be in the classroom without being enrolled you may be found to have violated the Code of Student Conduct, specifically Part 10 section p, which is “failure to comply with the directions of University officials, including campus police officers, acting in performance of their duties” and Part 10 section q, which is “violation of published University regulations or policies…”

Q: I was put on disciplinary probation for an underage drinking citation but the probation ended a few days ago. I never received a notice that my probation is over but I have a record of the date in which it would end from when I first got my sanction letter a year ago. Is my record clean now or do I have to file to have my record voided?
A: Students can always call the Office of Student Conduct at 301.314.8204 if they have a question about their specific case; however, typically students do not receive a letter when their probation is over.
You are also asking about voiding your record, which is different from your sanction being completed. Most records are automatically voided 3 years after the letter providing notice of final disciplinary action is sent, with the exception of suspension and expulsion records, which are kept permanently.
However, under the Code of Student Conduct, students who have a file with the Office of Student Conduct may petition to have their judicial file voided 90 days from the date of the letter providing notice of final disciplinary action. The “Petition to Void” process is a series of reflections done by the student and reviewed by the Office of Student Conduct staff. To begin this process, please email the Office of Student Conduct at studentconduct@umd.edu and ask for the petition to void materials.

Q: So I'm trying to advertise for my student organization. I noticed that a lot of the groups put up flyers on the walls of buildings, bathroom stalls, chalk on sidewalks, etc. Are you allowed to put up flyers anywhere in a public space? Also, what about putting flyers on car windshields (as annoying as that can be)? Thanks!
A: It can be confusing to find all of the correct policies for advertising at the University. There are many channels for students to advertise and the General Campus Policies outline the places students can advertise “including kiosks, public bulletin boards, and display cases.” Unfortunately spaces like “buildings, walls, trees, sidewalks, utility poles,” and cars are prohibited for advertising use. There’s also information here about chalking, use of display cases, and other advertising options you may have yet to consider. For more information about how student organizations can advertise you can contact the Student Organization Resource Center at 301-314-7158.

Q: So I posted a picture of part of my essay on the app Yik Yak with a funny comment as a joke. I eventually took it down because a lot of people were reading it and I didn't want anyone to steal my work. Did I violate the Code of Academic Integrity?
A: It sounds like you’ve already recognized that putting your work out in a place where people could use it isn’t the best idea. If another student used your work as their own, you might be charged with violating Part 1 (c) of the Code of Academic Integrity, which is defined as “intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of this Code.
When a case comes into the Office of Student Conduct we review the evidence for every student. In this case we could consider things like the comment associated with the Yik Yak post and the spirit in which it was posted.
In general, it’s best not to share your work because once it’s out on the Internet or in someone else’s hands, you don’t know what they’re going to do with it, and you could wind up with a referral from the Office of Student Conduct.

Q: Is the wifi monitored?
A: Yes, it is. While the University does attempt to maintain users’ privacy as much as possible, they need to ensure that individuals are using IT resources in accordance with the University of Maryland Policy on the Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources, found here. This includes upholding federal and state laws. So while the University probably isn’t monitoring things like how many cat videos students watch on Youtube or the funny Buzzfeed articles they read, the University does need to make sure that individuals using the IT resources are abiding by the law.

Q: Today there were some adult, non-student representatives of a church outside Hornbake Library, shouting at passerby, and handing out booklets. Some police officers came and dispersed them under the grounds that they don't have a permit.
I'm wondering, what kinds of public displays are you not allowed to do, with or without a permit on campus? Does being a student change what you're allowed to do on campus?
A: This is a great question about the First Amendment and how it applies on campus. Yes, being affiliated with the University does give you more rights on campus. The University Guidelines for Demonstrations and Leafletting, explain that those affiliated with the University may hold demonstrations or hand out materials, so long as they do not interfere with others’ rights or the operations of the University. Any non-University Affiliated person or group would need to seek permission from the University to give a demonstration or provide leaflets. The University of Maryland’s Freedom of Expression Policy and the Law, explains how the First Amendment applies to state universities and that, though state universities are public institutions, non-students are not necessarily afforded access to those facilities.

Q: Does using a PDF of a textbook for class, that you found online and did not purchase, violate the Code of Student Conduct and/or the Code of Academic Integrity?
A: In a nutshell, yes, it does. This type of behavior violates the University of Maryland Policy on the Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources, which can be found here, in two main ways. The Policy prohibits “using digital content (including software, music, text, images, and video) in violation of copyright.” It also prohibits “using IT resources for illegal activities,” which includes copyright infringement and unauthorized access. When you violate this Policy, you violate Part 10, Section (q) of the Code of Student Conduct, which includes the “violation of published University regulations or policies.”
Students who are found to have violated Part 10, Section (q) of the Code may receive sanctions that range from a disciplinary reprimand to revocation of access to IT Services, and/or disciplinary probation, depending on the severity of the violation.

Q: I recently received an email from the Office of Student Conduct reminding me that I am to conduct myself according the standards set by the University. Why did I get this email? Has someone indicated that I have not conducted myself appropriately?
A: The email you received was distributed to the entire University of Maryland community as a friendly reminder to abide by and brush up on the Code of Student Conduct, found here and the Code of Academic Integrity, found here. If you were to receive official correspondence from the Office of Student Conduct regarding allegations of misconduct, you will receive an email with a link to a letter requesting that you contact our office to schedule a meeting.

Q: What is the process of petitioning to void judicial file?
A: Under the Code of Student Conduct, students who have a file with the Office of Student Conduct may petition to have their judicial file voided 90 days from the date of the letter providing notice of final disciplinary action. The “Petition to Void” process is a series of reflections done by the student and reviewed by the Office of Student Conduct staff. To begin this process, please email the Office of Student Conduct at studentconduct@umd.edu and ask for the petition to void materials.

Q: Obviously it is illegal and against the Code of Student Conduct to sell copyrighted teaching materials, but is it against the Code to sell my own student notes, which are adapted from what I read in my class textbook and what I hear in lectures, to other students in my classes? The reason I ask is because I was contacted by an organization called StudySoup which has students sell quality study materials online to other students in their classes. I will make a profit from this and I want to be sure it will not get me kicked out of the University or sued.
A: This is always a risky move, as it could be considered copyright infringement. Many companies such as Course Hero, Course Villian, or the one you mentioned (StudySoup) are soliciting students improperly to upload course materials to share with their public/private network of users. When you take notes in a class, you are adapting the knowledge that the professors have created for their class. The University Commercial Use of Course Materials, which can be found here, explains that professors “do own the copyright in the selection and their expression of those facts and ideas.” While they may be your own notes, they are a reflection of the selection of materials that a professor has deemed important for that class, which may violate the Copyright laws/policies. The Policy further states that while you can use the notes for your own personal use, like studying, “persons who reproduce, distribute, post online or make derivative works based on Course Materials for any purpose other than their own personal use may be found to have infringed the copyrights of faculty in their Course Materials.”
Should you violate copyright law, this would be a violation of Part 10, Section 10 (q) of the Code of Student Conduct, which is “violation of published University regulations or policies, as approved and compiled by the Vice President for Student Affairs. Such regulations or policies may include the residence hall contract, as well as those regulations relating to entry and use of University facilities, sale of alcoholic beverages, use of vehicles and amplifying equipment, campus demonstrations, and misuse of identification cards.” You should always ask your professor if you are going to sell the notes you took from their original materials.
The textbook is also a copywritten source, and you may be violating their copyright policy by reproducing their materials. Violating copyright law by selling your notes could also result in civil or criminal charges.
It is also important to note that this could also violate the Code of Academic Integrity by facilitating academic dishonesty, which is defined as “intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of the Code” depending on what type of material is in your notes.

Q: Does posting information about how difficult an exam was considered to be a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity? Even if no information that was actually on the exam was not cited in the post?
A: This is a great question about how social media can be used to facilitate academic dishonesty! It is not against the Code of Academic Integrity to share your thoughts or feelings, as long as you do not post anything that could in some way give anyone an unfair advantage on the exam. Students have different experiences with exams – what may be difficult for one student, may not be as difficult for another student.
You should be careful if other students ask you for more details about the exam/assignment/practical. By giving someone more information you could be facilitating academic dishonesty, which is a violation of the Code of Academic Integrity and is defined as “intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another to violate any provision of this Code.”
It is always best to err on the side of giving less information, to protect yourself and maintain the integrity of the degrees conferred upon University of Maryland students. And remember, you can also check with the professor about whether you should post information about an exam. Their response may surprise you.

Q: I accepted a bid for a sorority last semester, and on Bid Day, I experienced an event I would consider hazing. I immediately quit the sorority. I have been on the fence about whether or not to report this, because this event was considered a national tradition and I don't want any of the girls that remain in the sorority to blame me for anything that might happen. This event was very difficult for me to come to terms with. Is there a way I can anonymously report this event? And is it too late to do so if it happened last semester?
A: This is an important question, and perfectly timed as this week is National Hazing Prevention Week, which begins today (9/21/15). It is never too late to report a suspected violation of the Code of Student Conduct. Our priority is the safety of our students, so if there is dangerous behavior occurring, we need to be informed so that it can be stopped.
You can find out information about hazing prevention by going here. There is information there about how to report incidents of alleged hazing to the University, and also how to do so anonymously/confidentially. Once it is reported, we can then follow up with the office or department that advises that organization (The Stamp, Dept. of Fraternity and Sorority Life, academic college, etc.).
Please note that just because you are reporting something doesn’t mean that you are getting someone or some group into trouble. Our primary concern is to stop disruptive or unsafe behavior from continuing. Indeed, it may be difficult to hold an organization, or its members, accountable for their actions without someone stepping forward as a witness to the behavior. However, sometimes a conversation with the leaders of an organization about their behavior is just as effective as a disciplinary meeting. It’s important that you step up and let the University know if there is something inappropriate or unsafe occurring because if it is affecting you, then it is affecting others and it should be addressed. #TerpsDontHaze

Q: What do I do if another student has slandered me and has used their position of authority to get me thrown out of a club?
A: I’m so sorry you have had this experience!
You could contact the University of Maryland Ombuds Services here and they can help you work through and find solutions to this issue. We also contacted the Student Legal Aid and found that they offer mediation services, which could potentially help you talk things through with the other student, for more information you can contact them here.
It is also important to note that your organization should have foundational documents that may include the process by which members can be removed, and it is possible that this process may not have been followed in this instance. Those documents should be on file with the Student Organization Resource Center, which you can contact here. Your club should also have a faculty advisor with whom you can speak about these issues.

Q: Hey, I was removed peaceably from a UMD event (Trevor Noah's performance) because I puked in a trash can after being sent back to the student section. I was removed by a staff member and a UMPD officer removed me and took my UID number and my campus address. I was wondering what my punishment would be.
A: That is an unfortunate way to kick off a “Terps After Dark” event. Given the information you have shared, there are a few parts of the Code of Student Conduct that you could have violated, but I’m not sure we have all the details of your encounter. If you are underage and were consuming alcohol, you could be charged with violating Part 10, Section (r) of the Code, which is defined as “Use or possession of any alcoholic beverage under the age of 21; knowingly providing alcoholic beverages to a person known to be under the age of 21.” You could also be charged with violating Part 10, Section (o), which is “Engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct which interferes with the activities of others, including studying, teaching, research, and University administration.”
The police officer took your information so that the University could follow up with you regarding your health and well-being. However, there may be consequences for your decision-making. For a first offense with the violations of the Code mentioned above, you may face a Disciplinary Reprimand and educational sanctions with an emphasis on alcohol education. If this is not your first offense, the sanctions could be more severe, as the University uses progressive sanctioning. For repeat offenses, the sanction could include Disciplinary Probation or even Suspension. In either instance a disciplinary record will be created at the University, which could impact your application to future jobs or schools. There is also a possibility that this could also affect your ability to attend future events held by SEE. Attending campus events is a privilege that can be revoked if disruptive behavior is evident.
If you are engaging in problematic alcohol-related behavior, please note that there are resources on campus that you can utilize, including the health center, which can be found here.

Q: Does using an academic writing service to produce a paper or essay violate the Code of Academic Integrity?
A: Yes, using an academic writing service to produce a paper or essay does violate the Code of Academic Integrity’s Part 1 section a, cheating, which is defined as “ fraud, deceit, or dishonesty in any academic course or exercise in an attempt to gain an unfair advantage and/or intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, or study aids in any academic course or exercise.” Because you have not written the paper yourself and are turning it in with your name on it, you are not doing the work you are getting credit for, and therefore being dishonest. The University exists as a place for students to learn and gain deeper knowledge, and writing papers and essays facilitates these processes; not writing your own papers inhibits this learning process, as well as deceives your professors by making them think you have mastered the material in a way that you haven’t. So do your best in your academic pursuits, write your own papers, and visit the resources that exist on campus to help you improve your own writing, such as visiting office hours or the writing center, which can be found here.

Q: If I am caught off campus with an fake ID, everything on it is correct except the birthdate, and police give me a citation that is forwarded to the school, how much trouble will I be in. I will be 21 in 2 weeks. Thanks.
A: Thanks for this question and happy early birthday! There are a lot of rumors floating around about what will get you into trouble regarding a fake ID, so here’s what will happen at the University: First of all, it’s important to note that using your real information versus fake information doesn’t make a difference if you are referred to the Office of Student Conduct for using a fake ID. Any ID that is not your own state-issued ID is considered a fake ID and is a violation of Part 10 section k of the Code of Student Conduct which is defined as: “making, possessing, or using any forged, altered, or falsified instrument of identification; making, possessing, or using any forged, altered, or falsified University document.” Violations of this section of the Code could result in suspension from the University, but the sanction imposed can range from a disciplinary reprimand to a suspension, depending on your judicial history with our Office.
Keep in mind, regardless of the sanction, you would have a disciplinary record with the University, and this could impact applications to future jobs or schools. It is also important to be aware that in the state of Maryland, you can have your driver’s license revoked for six months as a penalty for having a fake ID. So the best advice would be to shred your fake ID, wait the two weeks until your birthday, and then celebrate responsibly!
If you do get a citation, the Student Legal Aid Office on campus can help you handle the issue, and is a resource that is free to students.
Sometimes surrounding issues of fake IDs we see students struggling with alcohol-related issues. If you or your friends are experiencing any substance abuse issues, please contact the Health Center.

Q: If I wanted to report a non-Greek Life "fraternity" for inappropriate behavior (as whole, not an individual student), who would I talk to about that? Especially if I wanted to do it anonymously?
A: What a great first question of the year! It is in these first few weeks of the semester that we tend to see the most concerning behavior. It is also the best time to curb that behavior with proper information.
Please contact the Office of Student Conduct by sending an email to studentconduct@umd.edu or call our office at 301-314-8204. We can then follow up with the office or department that advises that organization (The Stamp, Dept. of Fraternity and Sorority Life, academic college, etc.).
To keep the correspondence confidential, simply state that in your correspondence with us.
Please note that just because you are reporting something doesn’t mean that you are getting someone or some group into trouble. Our primary concern is to stop disruptive or unsafe behavior from continuing. Indeed, it is unlikely that a student or group will face disciplinary action without someone stepping forward as a witness to the behavior. And sometimes an informational conversation with the leaders of an organization about their behavior is just as effective as a disciplinary meeting. It’s important that you step up and let the University know if there is something inappropriate or unsafe occurring because if it is affecting you, then it is affecting others and it should be addressed.
Best of luck this year! Keep those anonymous asks coming!

Q: Is there a statue of limitations on any violation?
A: There is no time limit to when a case can be brought to the Office of Student Conduct, and each incident is investigated. If the student has graduated, but the disciplinary matter occurred prior to graduation, charges could still be brought against the student; however, the timing of when the offense occurred could impact the sanction given.

Q: Does UMD have a process for individuals to report cyber security concerns?
A: Thank you for being an active bystander in wanting to report security concerns! Cyber security issues can be reported to the Division of Information Technology by emailing itsc@umd.edu, where your message will be triaged and sent to the proper IT division. If students wish to remain anonymous in their reports they may state this in their email, and this will be respected. To contact the department directly, you can visit the Division of IT's Security, Privacy, and Policy's contact page. This page explains which numbers to call in distinct situations. If you have knowledge of a crime that has occurred and you would like to report you can call the UMD Police at 301-405-3333 for emergencies or 301-405-5333 for non-emergencies.

Q: How does one get a no contact directive against another student? What sort of evidence against them is needed?
A: Thanks for your question! The Office of Student Conduct or the Department of Resident Life may issue no contact directives for alleged misconduct to protect the safety and welfare of university community members. Some examples of alleged misconduct that may warrant a ‘no contact’ order include threatening behavior, some form of harassment, and varied types of assaults. Should a student feel that a ‘no contact’ order is necessary, they should speak with a staff member in the Office of Student Conduct, the Department of Resident Life, or the Office of Sexual Misconduct and Civil Rights to make a formal report. There are other resources to seek advice on the matter that are confidential in nature such as the Counseling Center, CARE to Stop Violence, and Mental Health. The ‘no contact’ directive includes communication of any type including in person contact, telephone, postal mail, any electronic means, or third party communication. Any attempted or indirect contact is considered to be prohibited behavior.

Q: Would it be against any rules to fill one's dorm room with sand, a kiddie pool, and some potted palm trees to make a beach?
A: In a nutshell, yes. As fun as an indoor beach may sound, there are rules against activities that could damage University property or the property of others, and unauthorized modifications to a residence hall space is also prohibited. LaPlata Beach would probably be a better location for sandy fun.

Q: What if she doesn't say yes but just sort of lies still?
A: Engaging in sexual activity with a partner who does not give verbal or physical consent could definitely be considered Sexual Misconduct. In many situations involving Sexual Misconduct a person experiencing an assault or other unwanted behavior may not say “No” and may freeze, “just sort of lie still”, unable to respond in the moment. Anytime you are engaging in sexual activity you have a responsibility to make sure that the other person is willingly participating in all of the activity that is occurring. The University Sexual Misconduct Policy defines consent as a knowing, voluntary and affirmatively communicated willingness to participate in a particular sexual activity or behavior. It further states that only a person who has the ability and capacity to exercise free will and make a rational, reasonable judgment can give consent. Additionally, consent is an ongoing process, and can be withdrawn at any time. For further questions regarding the sexual misconduct policy, please see this link.

Q: Why is submitting my own paper for another class plagiarism? I did the work and everything is cited.
A: Thank you so much for being our first contributor! The reason students are generally not allowed to resubmit an assignment for two classes is because the student is receiving double the credit for one piece of work; thus it is an unfair academic advantage. However, it is a common misconception that students are forbidden from doing so: if a student obtains permission from both professors (the instructor from the class in which it was originally turned in and the instructor for the class with the new assignment) the the student may submit the same assignment. Most professors do not want recycled work; however, if allowed, a student should speak with their professor about the work to add new content to the original assignment. Thank you for asking such a thoughtful question! According to the Code of Student Conduct, Part 10 (r), the "use or possession of any alcoholic beverage under the age of 21; knowingly providing alcoholic beverages to a person known to be under the age of 21" is prohibited conduct. The Code also applies off campus, even when students are abroad. This means that drinking under the age of 21 anywhere is a violation of the Code of Student Conduct, however; under Part 9 (c) of the Code, the actions must "affect the safety of the University community or the orderly operation of the University" for a student to face any disciplinary action at the University.